Employing for the first time

There are a multitude of rules and regulations that you must be aware of when you start employing staff for the first time. HMRC’s guidance sets out important issues to be aware of when becoming an employer. Decide how much to pay someone - you

There are a multitude of rules and regulations that you must be aware of when you start employing staff for the first time.

HMRC’s guidance sets out important issues to be aware of when becoming an employer.

  1. Decide how much to pay someone – you must pay your employee at least the National Minimum Wage.
  2. Check if someone has the legal right to work in the UK. You may have to do other employment checks as well.
  3. Check if you need to apply for a DBS check (formerly known as a CRB check) if you work in a field that requires one, e.g., with vulnerable people or security.
  4. Get employment insurance – you need employers’ liability insurance as soon as you become an employer.
  5. Send details of the job (including terms and conditions) in writing to your employee. You need to give your employee a written statement of employment if you’re employing someone for more than 1 month.
  6. Ensure that you register as an employer with HMRC. You can do this up to 4 weeks before you pay your new staff.  This process must also be completed by directors of a limited company who employ themselves to work in the company.
  7. Check if you need to automatically enrol your staff into a workplace pension scheme.

When it comes to paying staff, you generally have the choice between using a payroll provider or running your payroll yourself. If you decide to run your own payroll you must choose suitable payroll software. 

We can help.

Source: HM Revenue & Customs Tue, 01 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0100

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