Gifts to spouse or charity

In most cases, there is no capital gains tax (CGT) to be paid on the transfer of assets to a spouse or civil partner. There is, however, still a disposal that has taken place for CGT purposes effectively at no gain or loss on the date of the

In most cases, there is no capital gains tax (CGT) to be paid on the transfer of assets to a spouse or civil partner. There is, however, still a disposal that has taken place for CGT purposes effectively at no gain or loss on the date of the transfer. When the asset ultimately comes to be sold, the gain or loss will be calculated from when the original spouse or civil partner first owned the asset..

There are a few exceptions that couples should be aware of where the relief does not apply. This mainly relates to the use of goods which are sold on by the transferee’s business and for couples that were separated and not living together for the entire tax year when the assets were transferred. Spouses or civil partners that lived together at any point in the tax year when the assets were transferred can still benefit from these rules. If a transfer did not qualify then the asset must be retrospectively valued at the date of the transfer and the transferor is liable for any gain or loss.

There are similar rules for assets that are gifted to charities. However, CGT may be due where an asset is sold to a charity for more than was paid for it and less than the market value. The gain in this case would be calculated based on what the charity paid rather than the market value of the asset.

Source: HM Revenue & Customs Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 +0100

Latest INSIGHTS

Check out our latest Insights for useful accounting tips and information.

Falling inflation – what does it mean for you?

The following notes are reproduced from a Treasury statement issued 21 May 2024.

Lower inflation supports people by maintaining the purchasing power of their money.

If prices only rise slowly, people can plan their budgets more effectively –

Read More

New Brooms

As time passes during the present election campaign, its seems more likely that we may have a change of government from the 5 July.

Labour have disclosed a number of tax changes they would introduce. To summarise they are:

Private school fees

Read More

Tax Diary July/August 2024

1 July 2024 – Due date for corporation tax due for the year ended 30 September 2023.

6 July 2024 – Complete and submit forms P11D return of benefits and expenses and P11D(b) return of Class 1A NICs.

19 July 2024 – Pay Class 1A NICs (by the 22 July

Read More