Tax relief if working from home

If you are an employee working from home, you may be able to claim tax relief for some of the bills you pay that are related to your work. Employers can reimburse employees for the additional household expenses incurred by working at home. The

If you are an employee working from home, you may be able to claim tax relief for some of the bills you pay that are related to your work. 

Employers can reimburse employees for the additional household expenses incurred by working at home. The relief covers expenses such as business telephone calls or heating and lighting costs for the room you are working in. Expenses that are for both for private and business use (such as broadband) cannot be claimed. Employees may also be able to claim tax relief on equipment they have bought, such as a laptop, chair or mobile phone.

Employers can pay up to £6 per week (or £26 a month for employees paid monthly) to cover an employee’s additional costs if they have to work from home. Employees do not need to keep any specific records if they receive this fixed amount. 

If the expenses or allowances are not paid by the employer, then you can claim tax relief directly from HMRC. You will get tax relief based on your highest tax rate. For example, if you pay the basic (20%) rate of tax and claim tax relief on £6 a week, then you would get £1.20 per week in tax relief (20% of £6). You can claim more than the quoted amount but will need to provide evidence to HMRC. HMRC will accept backdated claims for up to 4 years. 

These tax reliefs are available to anyone who has been asked to work from home on a regular basis, either for all or part of the week including working from home because of coronavirus.

Source: HM Revenue & Customs Tue, 22 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0100

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