Use HMRC’s tax app to save time

A free HMRC tax app is available and offers some useful functionality. In fact, in the 12 months up to October 2022, HMRC received almost 3 million calls from people asking for information that is now readily available on the app. This

A free HMRC tax app is available and offers some useful functionality. In fact, in the 12 months up to October 2022, HMRC received almost 3 million calls from people asking for information that is now readily available on the app.

This included:

  • 354,499 calls from people who forgot/lost their National Insurance number;
  • 444,301 calls from people who wanted their employment history and tax details; and
  • 323,381 calls from people who wanted their tax codes.

The information can also be downloaded and printed – so there is no need to call HMRC to ask for it to be sent in the post.

The APP can be used to see:

  • your tax code and National Insurance number;
  • an estimate of the tax you need to pay;
  • your income and benefits;
  • how much you will receive in tax credits and when they will be paid;
  • your Unique Taxpayer Reference (UTR) for self-assessment; and
  • how much self-assessment tax you owe.

The app can also be used to complete a number of tasks that usually require the user to be logged on to a computer. This includes:

  • make a self-assessment payment;
  • renew and report changes to your tax credits;
  • access your Help to Save account;
  • using HMRC’s tax calculator to work out your take home pay after Income Tax and National Insurance deductions;
  • track forms and letters you’ve sent to us;
  • claim a refund if you’ve paid too much tax; and
  • update your postal address.

The app is available to download from the App Store for iOS and from the Google Play Store for Android.

Source: HM Revenue & Customs Tue, 29 Nov 2022 00:00:00 +0100

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